Paleo & Anti-Inflammatory Coconut Lime Chicken

Cooking with foods that decrease inflammation in the body doesn’t have to be a time-intensive labour. Here’s a few reasons why this recipe is so nourishing:

  • Onions and garlic are rich in sulfur which fuel our innate detoxification pathways and support our main anti-oxidant in our body, glutathione.
  • Cilantro, and most fresh herbs, are full of trace minerals that help each cell function optimally. Cilantro also contains flavonoids that act as anti-oxidants, protecting sun-damaged skin, and supporting collagen.
  • Ginger is a lovely warming herb that improves digestion by decreasing nausea, and easing gas and cramping in the intestinal tract.
  • Lime juice contains citric acid, which helps decrease oxidative stress in organs like the brain and liver.

Recipe:

  • 3-4 chicken breasts
  • 1-2 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 4-5 cloves of minced garlic
  • ⅓ cup chopped cilantro, plus extra for garnish
  • 1 Tbsp minced or microplane-grated fresh ginger
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1 can full fat coconut milk

Method:

  1. Saute chicken breasts in medium-hot pan with coconut oil, approximately 4-5 minutes per side; remove from pan and set aside (they won’t be fully cooked yet).
  2. Add more coconut oil to pan if needed, add onions and garlic, and saute until onion is translucent and lightly browned.
  3. Add coconut milk, juice of 1 lime, chopped cilantro, and ginger. Simmer for 5-8 minutes.
  4. Add the chicken breasts back into the pan, cover with a lid and simmer on a low-medium heat for 15 minutes.
  5. Serve with cauliflower rice or regular rice (or saute cauliflower in garlic and coconut oil). Add fresh cilantro for extra colour and flavour. Enjoy!

References:

Hwang, Eunson, et al. “Coriander leaf extract exerts antioxidant activity and protects against UVB-induced photoaging of skin by regulation of procollagen type I and MMP-1 expression.” Journal of medicinal food 17.9 (2014): 985-995.

Abdel-Salam, Omar ME, et al. “Citric acid effects on brain and liver oxidative stress in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.” Journal of medicinal food 17.5 (2014): 588-598.

 

Jenny Schmidt-White, ND

Hi, I’m Dr. Jenny Schmidt-White. My practice focuses on family health and wellness, healthy aging for men and women and optimizing fertility & hormone function. I work with you, within realistic and sustainable parameters, to find the root cause of dysfunction in your body and address it.


Leave a Reply